Federal - S 151

A bill to deter criminal robocall violations and improve enforcement of section 227(b) of the Communications Act of 1934, and for other purposes.

Introduced

January 16, 2019

Description

A bill to deter criminal robocall violations and improve enforcement of section 227(b) of the Communications Act of 1934, and for other purposes.

Our Position

Monitoring

Original Sponsor 1

Co-Sponsors 84

Latest Actions See More/Less

  • Dec. 30, 2019 — Became Public Law, PL 116-105, 133 Stat. 3274.

  • Dec. 30, 2019 — Signed by the president.

  • Dec. 19, 2019 — Enrolled measure signed in the House. Congressional Record p. H12295, H12296

  • Dec. 19, 2019 — Enrolled measure signed in the Senate. Congressional Record p. S7206

  • Dec. 19, 2019 — Measure cleared for the president. Congressional Record p. S7177

  • Dec. 19, 2019 — Measure passed in the Senate by voice vote, via motion to concur. Congressional Record p. S7177

  • Dec. 19, 2019 — Thune, R-S.D., motion to concur in the House amendment to the bill, agreed to by voice vote. Congressional Record p. S7177

  • Dec. 19, 2019 — Considered by the Senate. Congressional Record p. S7177

  • Dec. 5, 2019Dingell, D-Mich., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.647, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. E1544

  • Dec. 5, 2019McGovern, D-Mass., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.647, and would have voted yea if present.

  • Dec. 5, 2019Cunningham, D-S.C., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.647, and would have voted yea if present.

  • Dec. 4, 2019Bera, D-Calif., House speech: Personal explanation for roll call vote no.647, and would have voted yea if present. Congressional Record p. H9247

  • Dec. 4, 2019 — Measure, as amended, passed in the House by roll call vote, 417-3, under suspension of the rules. Congressional Record p. H9246-H9247

  • Dec. 4, 2019House Vote 647 Robocall Enforcement and Deterrence — Passage
    Pallone, D-N.J., motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended, that would require the Federal Communications Commission to take certain actions and implement regulations related to robocalls -- mass telephone calls placed by an automatic dialer -- including regulations that would require phone companies to offer call authentication technology at no cost to consumers. It would allow the FCC to issue civil penalties of up to $10,000 for intentional violation of robocalling laws. It would extend, from two years to four years after a violation, the time period during which the FCC and law enforcement agencies can prosecute illegal robocallers, and it would require the FCC to submit evidence of certain violations to the Justice Department for potential criminal prosecution. It would also require the Justice Department and the FCC to convene an interagency task force to study enforcement of robocalling law. Among other provisions, it would require the FCC to take actions to address "one-ring" phone call scams and to evaluate the effectiveness of its policies to reduce access to number resources by potential violators of robocalling laws, and update such policies if appropriate. It would require the FCC to submit a number of reports to Congress related to robocalls, including on the transmission of misleading or inaccurate caller identification information, enforcement of related laws and regulations, and effectiveness of the regulations required by the bill. Motion agreed to 417-3. Note: A two-thirds majority of those present and voting (280 in this case) is required for passage under suspension of the rules. Congressional Record p. H9235-H9245, H9246-H9247

  • Nov. 27, 2019Draft bill text released by Rep. Pallone, D-N.J.; Sen. Thune, R-S.D.

  • May 24, 2019 — Received in the House and referred to the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Congressional Record p. H4170

  • May 23, 2019Senate Vote 127 Robocall Enforcement and Deterrence — Passage
    Passage of the bill, as amended, that would allow the Federal Communications Commission to issue civil penalties of up to $10,000 per call for individuals who intentionally violate telemarketing laws. It would require the FCC to submit an annual report to Congress detailing the enforcement of the laws, regulations, and policies related to robocalls and "spoofed" calls, including the number of complaints received by the FCC, the number of citations and notices of liability issued, and the amount of the proposed forfeiture penalty for each notice. The bill would require the FCC, within 18 months of enactment, to require voice communication providers to adopt a certain framework for call authentication standards to digitally certify caller identifications. It would require the FCC to submit a report to Congress on the extent of implementation and the effectiveness of the framework within one year of enactment, and to review and revise the framework every three years. The bill would require the FCC to issue a number of rules related to call authentication, including to outline when voice communications providers may block calls based on call authentication information, to establish liability safe harbors for such providers in the case of unintended call blocking, and to protect phone service subscribers from receiving calls or text messages from unauthenticated phone numbers. It would also require the FCC to evaluate its policies related to number resource access and modify its policies if it determines that doing so would reduce access by potential violators of telemarketing laws. The bill would require the attorney general and the FCC chairman to develop an interagency working group to study, in consultation with certain non-governmental stakeholders, and report to Congress on robocall-type violations of existing law, and on government prosecution and prevention of such violations. It would require the working group to submit a report to Congress within 270 days of the bill?s enactment that would include recommendations on how to further deter robocalls and increase criminal prosecution of robocall scams at both the federal and state level. The group?s recommendations could also address the need for a memorandum of understanding with any foreign governments regarding the prosecution and prevention of robocall violations. Passed 97-1. Note: In the legislative day that began on May 22, 2019. Congressional Record p. S3077

  • May 23, 2019 — Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee-reported substitute amendment adopted by unanimous consent. (In the legislative day that began on May 22, 2019.) Congressional Record p. S3076

  • May 23, 2019 — Considered by the Senate. (In the legislative day that began on May 22, 2019.) Congressional Record p. S3075-S3077

  • May 21, 2019 — Reported to the Senate with an amendment in the nature of a substitute by the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and placed on the Legislative Calendar. S Rept 116-41Congressional Record p. S3004

  • May 21, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Isakson, (R-Ga.)Shelby, (R-Ala.)
  • May 20, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Enzi, (R-Wyo.)Hawley, (R-Mo.)Jones, (D-Ala.)
  • May 15, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Feinstein, (D-Calif.)Warner, (D-Va.)
  • May 13, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Gillibrand, (D-N.Y.)Stabenow, (D-Mich.)
  • May 9, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Booker, (D-N.J.)Risch, (R-Idaho)
  • May 8, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Kaine, (D-Va.)Scott, T. (R-S.C.)Toomey, (R-Pa.)
  • May 7, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Leahy, (D-Vt.)
  • May 6, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Inhofe, (R-Okla.)Sanders, (I-Vt.)
    Murphy, C. (D-Conn.)Sullivan, (R-Alaska)
  • May 2, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Ernst, (R-Iowa)
  • May 1, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Schumer, (D-N.Y.)
  • April 30, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Heinrich, (D-N.M.)Merkley, (D-Ore.)Perdue, (R-Ga.)
  • April 29, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 8

    Bennet, (D-Colo.)Coons, (D-Del.)Hirono, (D-Hawaii)
    Burr, (R-N.C.)Cotton, (R-Ark.)Manchin (D-W.Va.)
    Casey, (D-Pa.)Crapo, (R-Idaho)
  • April 11, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Collins, S. (R-Maine)Kennedy, John (R-La.)
    Hassan, (D-N.H.)Shaheen, (D-N.H.)
  • April 10, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Blunt, (R-Mo.)Lankford, (R-Okla.)
    Hyde-Smith, (R-Miss.)Wyden, (D-Ore.)
  • April 9, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 6

    Boozman, (R-Ark.)McSally, (R-Ariz.)Rounds, (R-S.D.)
    Cardin, (D-Md.)Reed, J. (D-R.I.)Smith, (D-Minn.)
  • April 8, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 4

    Cornyn, (R-Texas)Peters, G. (D-Mich.)
    Harris, K. (D-Calif.)Roberts, (R-Kan.)
  • April 4, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 3

    Barrasso, (R-Wyo.)Cortez Masto, (D-Nev.)Van Hollen, (D-Md.)
  • April 3, 2019 — Full committee consideration and markup held by the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee.

    April 3, 2019 — Committee Vote: En Bloc Bills and Amendments — Vote to Report
    Ordered reported favorably to the full Senate (en bloc, as amended) by voice vote.

  • April 3, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 7

    Brown, S. (D-Ohio)Grassley, (R-Iowa)Scott, (R-Fla.)
    Carper, (D-Del.)Johnson, R. (R-Wis.)
    Daines, (R-Mont.)Menendez, (D-N.J.)
  • April 2, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Rosen, (D-Nev.)Udall, (D-N.M.)
  • March 28, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 1

    Wicker, (R-Miss.)
  • March 26, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 8

    Baldwin, (D-Wis.)King, A. (I-Maine)Warren, (D-Mass.)
    Blackburn, (R-Tenn.)Tester, (D-Mont.)Young, T. (R-Ind.)
    Cramer, (R-N.D.)Tillis, (R-N.C.)
  • March 14, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 2

    Fischer, (R-Neb.)Sinema, (D-Ariz.)
  • March 7, 2019 — Additional cosponsor(s): 10

    Blumenthal, (D-Conn.)Gardner, (R-Colo.)Rubio, (R-Fla.)
    Capito, (R-W.Va.)Hoeven, (R-N.D.)Whitehouse, (D-R.I.)
    Duckworth, (D-Ill.)Klobuchar, (D-Minn.)
    Durbin, (D-Ill.)Moran, (R-Kan.)
  • Jan. 16, 2019 — Original cosponsor(s): 1

    Markey, (D-Mass.)
  • Jan. 16, 2019 — Read twice and referred to: Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation.Congressional Record p. S273